1 The constraints: 1) No more than
one hour. 2) No more than 20 lines.
The result ? Genius or Not.

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7th April 2011

By Cassandra Moss | 2011 April 07

Rounded lips as the back part of the tongue is raised towards the soft palate. Then open mouth, keep lips rounded, tongue away from the roof of the mouth and as far back as possible without creating constriction. Next, blade of the tongue behind the alveolar ridge and tongue domed at the palate. Finally, rounded lips and tongue far back without creating constriction: /wɒ ʒɔ:/.*

Repeating slower and slower, trying to isolate each sound, and constantly losing meaning.

/welaɪ səpəʊ zɪt dɪpendz aɪ min wɒ ʒɔ: əpɪnjə nɒn ɪt/ In a busy place, many voices, some music from somewhere and the thought that I should get back to what I was doing because I need to get going soon, but I am engaging in a way and I answer saying /jeə ɪ zə kɒmplɪkeɪtɪ dɪʃju:/ and that's that, with eye-lines matched, a rough approximation of intent, that's the exchange over and done with, chunks of sound imbibed but undigested, lacking the necessary enzymes to break them down, but I can get back to that thing I was doing and think in similar connected noises that are all but impossible to disentangle from one another.

He misshapes his mouth, moving his tongue when he should be keeping it still and stares at the letters in his book, unable to comprehend why it's impossible to just say what's written in print. Instead of /z/, he's producing /d/, but cannot hear the difference between them. The point is, I begin, but stop because that phrase - /ðə pɔɪn tɪz/ - is useless: there is no point if you are actually listening to every single word as if it is essential to understanding the point of what is being said. So, /wɒ ʒɔ:/: repeat slow and then fast, the meaning is irrelevant; slow then fast, repeat endlessly.

When there is space and silence or there is absence, there is an anticipation that something will fill it and that it'll be worth its difference.



*See IPA

Speech, Imprecision

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